Nov 21 2014

Tweet. Congress Listens.

Posted by: CRAFT

When you tweet, does Congress listen?

As organizations and constituents ponder that question, CRAFT has perfected the answer.

CRAFT has worked with top social networks, members of Congress, trade associations, and candidates.  We understand how social media can be used to complement government affairs efforts by creating awareness around a legislative issue, amplifying a legislators’ position, or bringing attention to a non-supporter. Utilizing social media to advance government affairs initiatives drives results.

When engaging with a member of Congress on social media, it’s most effective to tailor your message to their audience and constituents. Localizing the message in a way that is pertinent to the Member’s constituency is the most effective method to draw engagement. This is why CRAFT’s social media and digital advocacy approach is successful.

On behalf of our clients, we engage with legislators who support our issues, thanking them for their leadership.

Costa

However, we are not afraid to reach out to those that are indecisive or who take harmful policy stances.

Steve Stivers

This begins a conversation that creates tangible results.

Baldwin engagement

In a recent survey, congressional staffers noted that their members found social communication to be authentic and organic,

“In a poll of House and Senate offices by the Congressional Management Foundation, three quarters of senior staff said that between one and 30 comments on social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter were enough to grab their attention on an issue. Thirty-five percent said that fewer than 10 comments were enough.” (Source: Connectivity by Roll Call)

At CRAFT, we adhere to this approach.  By leveraging creative to engage with congressional leaders, their staff, and their constituents. Social media has become an essential component of any government affairs initiative.

potato punjoni

So start the conversation, because when you tweet, Congress listens.